Yard

Every once and a while a band comes along and crafts so many stylistic changes in a song, it really makes you thrilled at just how sweet they tie together. Here is a band called wildonestheband from the Portland scene on tour right now headed to NY. They have two dates in NY, August 12th and Pianos and August 15th at Glasslands.

Bio:”In late 2012, Wild Ones was on the verge of collapse. Guitarist Clayton Knapp had blown out an eardrum, the band’s original drummer left the group and his replacement, Seve Sheldon, was in the hospital with a punctured lung, practicing songs on a drum pad with a tube sticking out of his chest. The band’s members had funneled all of their money into a debut record, Keep It Safe, that had taken a year to write and nine months to record and mix.”

…paying your band is a risk for a venue, not an asset…

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The otherside of the coin, I think both are in a working relationship and that if both the venue and musicians find the middle ground and there is no offense defense game then everyone gets what they want, what do you guys think?

"Put on your "business goggles" and look at your band through the eyes of a venue operator and you will see a financial risk, not an asset. This happens for a lot of reasons. Many of you fail to stop and think about how many other bands walk into a venue on a daily basis and shower the owners with promises of sold out shows. Then the night of the show arrives and you bring in around 100 people. Why is this such a huge financial risk for the venue? Not only would they be in the hole for what they agreed to pay you for performing, the owners would have scheduled too many employees to work (waitresses, bartenders, cooks, hostesses, dishwashers, bussers, etc). That is a lot of money to not make back because you made empty promises about crowds you knew you couldn’t bring. And imagine how pissed off the employees would be if they were told they had to work on a Friday or Saturday night only to get sent home two hours into the shift. In that case, not only is the venue out a lot of money, now their employees are unhappy.

Want to know how you can clear this hurdle? Develop a strong reputation for drawing big crowds on a consistent basis. There are two things you can do to start down that road. The first tip is to start putting a serious and legitimate effort into collecting e-mails and expanding your fan base. And don’t just collect e-mails, segment them. That means be sure to get the zip codes of every person signing up. Want to impress a venue owner and put yourself in a better BUSINESS position to leverage more money? Slap down a list of 800 e-mail subscribers all living within a twenty mile drive of the venue. That is 800 people you can market to directly about that show.

The second tip goes hand-in-hand with the first. Many of you need to start branching out and stop playing in the same geographical area night after night. I see so many bands doing two and three shows a week, every week, in an area of about a 20-mile radius. I’m not talking about bands in major cities; I’m seeing this from bands in rural areas. You are damaging the demand for your product, which is weakening your business leverage against the venue. People are less likely to come to your show on a Friday night when they know they can see you Saturday or Sunday night…or some time next week. So many of you are burning out your audiences and it is ruining your ability to get more money from venue operators. Stop saying, “I’ll start playing venues that are farther away when I have more fans coming to my shows here”. Go do it NOW so you can build up your fan base, play more cities, and make your shows back home MEAN something when they happen.” - Wade Sutton of Rocket to the Stars.

…the fine line between “art” and “business”

"You can be an "artist" in the privacy of your own home or when you are recording or when you are playing at an event that doesn’t involve money. But once you step into the realm of playing in exchange for cash, you leave the sanctuary of being an "artist" and enter the no-holds-barred world of "business". That changes the rules quite drastically because the level of expectations becomes much different and you suddenly introduce several variables of which you have little or no control over. Once money is involved you become a businessman (or woman), a marketer, and a customer service representative.

The music business is a business of relationships and you need to have good relationships with your fans as well as the venues at which you are hoping to play. Yet I see so many of you burning bridges by publicly blasting the venue operators for not giving you what you want instead of creating a better situation for yourselves. And you CAN make a better situation for yourselves. I know you can because there are bands out there right now “making it” just fine, only they aren’t sitting around bitching and moaning about the current state of things and are finding new ways to thrive in the evolving business environment.” - Wade Sutton of Rocket to the Stars

To complain is always nonacceptance of what is. It invariably carries an unconscious negative charge. When you complain, you make yourself into a victim. When you speak out, you are in your power. So change the situation by taking action or by speaking out if necessary or possible; leave the situation or accept it. All else is madness.

E.K.T.

GENTLEMAN BRAWLERS - My Theory

"@Gentlemanbrawlers are a band known for intense performances that walk the lines between slick songcraft, theatrical flair, and sonic experimentation. Hailing from the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens, the group consists of Becca Fox (vocals), Jim Thomson (guitar/vocals), Matt “CK” Walsh (guitar/vocals), Alexis Arkus-Duntov (bass) and Zach Clancy (drums). They all played in other East Coast bands before the group formed in early 2011, most notably Thomson with Hardly Art/Sub Pop alums Le Loup, and Walsh with New Yorker cartoonist Andy Friedman’s band, the Other Failures.

One part harmonically adventurous rock band and one part classic vocal group, The Brawlers pen memorable hooks and sing them in tight 3-part harmony over a musical bed that fuses Thomson and Walsh’s ambient, chiming guitar arpeggios with Clancy & Arkus-Duntov’s slippery Latin & funk polyrhythms. Led visually by vocalist/dancer Becca Fox’s compelling sense of stagecraft, the Gentleman Brawlers appear determined to contradict the shoegazing indie world’s apparent embargo on showmanship.”

Julie Slick - infinity x 1

Ping pong guitars played in a pocket so deep, it all makes sense when you read this amazing musicians bio. Apparently a bass virtuoso is what you need to be in order to keep the rhythm section so tight. Reminds me a bit of church drummer meets Jaco Pastorious. The math isn’t over bearing for you mellow-troaders, there is plenty of jazz elements but they blend well with a choice of tone layers so it won’t kill your vibe(ster).

Biography:

"Julie Slick is a virtuoso bassist and composer known for her wide array of unique tones and substantial melodic invention. In her seven year career, she has developed a distinctive voice through international performances and recording with acclaimed first class musicians in both the progressive rock and jazz communities (with the Adrian Belew Power Trio, Crimson ProjeKct, Motzer Slick Ti, PAPER CAT, Springs, DRGN King, and butterscotch bonnets)."

Hades - Coast Guard

Featuring Rob Hardie, Susie Hardie and Jordan Mcghin comes a band called Hades from Atlanta, Georgia. Could the song “Coast Guard” have been caught in a dream of mine or past life? I want to get lost on all the roads that lead to these emotional jitters… Amphetamine drums kick in to a much heavier guitar driven section in the song that takes you by surprise, before it returns to a noise/melting pot of post-metal band tricks meeting some radiohead-esq feedback. Impressive mix of influences to say the least, and a superb debut ep by a band I have never heard of till trenching the depths of bandcamp’s abyss. 

What a great night of music ahead tonight at @cameogallery for women of electro-ambient variety. For ten bucks seriously! 
if you want to: drink but not rage, hook up, groove out
starts: 8pm
Headlining is Half Waif is the project of Nandi Rose Plunkett. It began, and continues today, in a bedroom in Brooklyn. It is a tribute to both the dark resonance of that borough and to the textures of her multicultural childhood home.
Natureboy is the musical project of Sara Kermanshahi. The project continues her musical collaboration with Cedar Apffel (Masterface/ House on A Hill) who produced her records. Starkly emotional and strangely evocative, her music weaves modern loops and samples with folk elements to create a haunting synthesis of moody, intelligent, melodic music. Natureboy will appeal to fans of Mazzy Star, Beach House, Cat Power, and Bon Iver.

What a great night of music ahead tonight at @cameogallery for women of electro-ambient variety. For ten bucks seriously! 

if you want to: drink but not rage, hook up, groove out

starts: 8pm

Headlining is Half Waif is the project of Nandi Rose Plunkett. It began, and continues today, in a bedroom in Brooklyn. It is a tribute to both the dark resonance of that borough and to the textures of her multicultural childhood home.

Natureboy is the musical project of Sara Kermanshahi. The project continues her musical collaboration with Cedar Apffel (Masterface/ House on A Hill) who produced her records. Starkly emotional and strangely evocative, her music weaves modern loops and samples with folk elements to create a haunting synthesis of moody, intelligent, melodic music. Natureboy will appeal to fans of Mazzy Star, Beach House, Cat Power, and Bon Iver.

Work Drugs - Beyond Greenpoint

Work Drugs is a Philadelphia based sedative-wave/smooth-fi group fronted by Thomas Crystal and Benjamin Louisiana and they are coming to Brooklyn! Electrifying your lowered chin while you text your bff, they radiate a good time with smart hooks.

Looking incredibly stunning and graceful on a flower-power bike is front women Alexandra Paloma of the band AK. Here is a debut music video for the song “Circles” from this nativestream guest visitor. (Listen to our interview here)

Song “Circles” written and performed by AK, Copyright 2013
Directed by David Formentin
Filmed by Ray Levé

Filmed in Ditmas Park, Brooklyn

ak-ak-ak.com
ak-ak-ak.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/thebandak

Just in time for @thebandak brand new music video just released titled, ‘Circles” comes the release of our podcast with her, enjoy, and stay tuned as local fantasy rockers @auntange is next!

"Between California, Boston, and New York comes a story of a women from artist parents who’s dreams for their daughter were fulfilled when she choose music as her education and career path. That’s what landed singer/song writer Alexandra Paloma for the band called “AK ” (a play off her name) at Boston University and eventually to New York City. We speak about her education and her post education musical evolution and yes eventually she shares the story of her wonderful trademark glasses, all here on another podcast of #nativestreams.”

http://nativestreams.podbean.com/e/alexandrapaloma/

Locals Shy Hunter have these great 80’s inspired back-beats with frantic guitar solos, lead by the wonderful vocals of singer Indigo Street, and you’re in luck because they are playing a show at Baby’s All right in a week! Check out their tunes on their bandcamp.

Local show: